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08 Feb 2007 280 views
 
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photoblog image Bay Crossings clock

Bay Crossings clock

This was taken inside the San Francisco Ferry Building, Bay Crossings Shop.

This Clock's original setting was overlooking the lobby of the Oakland Mole Terminal in Oakland, circa 1930's.  The Oakland Mole was the transfer point for rail riders connecting from the East Bay to ferries bound for San Francisco and points beyond.  It was essentially the East Bay Ferry Building.
 
When the Oakland Mole was demolished, unknown persons saved the clock dial, though its workings were lost.  For about half a century it was passed from person to person for safekeeping, ending up in the enlightened care of Dick McNight of San Francisco, who made it available to Bay Crossings.

The historic San Francisco Ferry Building was first built in 1898 as the city's transportation center. Its distinctive tower punctuates the waterfront, and since a 2003 renovation, it's become one of the city's premiere stops for foodies who love its boutique food shops, restaurants and the weekly farmers market.

History provided by: Bobby Winston, Bay Crossings.

Bay Crossings clock

This was taken inside the San Francisco Ferry Building, Bay Crossings Shop.

This Clock's original setting was overlooking the lobby of the Oakland Mole Terminal in Oakland, circa 1930's.  The Oakland Mole was the transfer point for rail riders connecting from the East Bay to ferries bound for San Francisco and points beyond.  It was essentially the East Bay Ferry Building.
 
When the Oakland Mole was demolished, unknown persons saved the clock dial, though its workings were lost.  For about half a century it was passed from person to person for safekeeping, ending up in the enlightened care of Dick McNight of San Francisco, who made it available to Bay Crossings.

The historic San Francisco Ferry Building was first built in 1898 as the city's transportation center. Its distinctive tower punctuates the waterfront, and since a 2003 renovation, it's become one of the city's premiere stops for foodies who love its boutique food shops, restaurants and the weekly farmers market.

History provided by: Bobby Winston, Bay Crossings.

comments (5)

Thank you for the history lesson and this good image of an obviously aged clock.
John Eagle: You are welcome.
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 8 Feb 2007, 10:24
I LOVE your crop on this, John. You know me and clocks! Do you know the approximate diameter of this face?
John Eagle: Thanks. I would say the diameter is about 6-7 feet. This was originally in a ferry building in Oakland so It was quite high up and had to be seen from far away. It is now on a wall inside and can be approached. So you can see all the cracks and weathering. Quite cool.
  • Louis
  • 8 Feb 2007, 13:51
A very nice posting for today. What i am not sure of, is the clock now working again, or is it still just the face?

For another intriguing clock see Pinto blog of today.
John Eagle: Thanks. The clock is still working. The clock is powered today by workings provided by Balzer Family Clockworks of Maine. Special thanks to Anna Falche and Guy Span. Preservation work done by Leo Tiente. The clock was mounted by Steve Bernardini of Bernardini Construction.
Well done and time to lunch smile
John Eagle: Thanks. And it was. We ate shortly there afetr. smile
Wow another great history for a regular photo, great job John!

Javier
John Eagle: tongue

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